A Sidekick's Blog

Discernment

September 17, 2016
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Every Christian has “discernment.”  Jesus Himself said so:

“When he puts forth his own, he goes ahead of them, and the sheep follow him because they know his voice.  A stranger they simply will not follow, but will flee from him, because they do not know the voice of strangers.”

To a Charismatic, it’s a special gift that only a select few have!  But the gift of discerning spirits listed among the charismata in 1st Corinthians 12-14 was different from the natural discernment of the Lord’s sheep.  It was the ability to see and distinguish angels and demons. Examples include the army of angel warriors that Elisha saw when Elijah asked God to open his eyes, and the Apostles’ recognition of demons in Acts, where even a truth-saying spirit was recognized and expelled (Acts 16:16ff).

Please enjoy this excellent article from Pulpit & Pen:

Within the Charismatic Movement, discernment is often viewed as this supernatural ability to see if the spirit which influenced something is a good spirit or a demon. That is not what true discernment is in the modern context. Others within the same movement say that discernment is a supernatural feeling you get that tells you…

via What Discernment Is and Isn’t — Pulpit & Pen

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Holy Spirit Baptism: Part Four

April 19, 2014
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This is Part Four, the last of a series on Holy Spirit baptism. Until now it has only touched on a couple of the doctrinal issues which are ordinarily raised in any discussion of the topic, or of the related topics of spiritual gifts, speaking in tongues, and/or the offices of prophet and apostle beyond the first century AD. Be sure to read the previous parts to get a full sense of the topic and why I write as I do about it.

Part Three left off at West Lauderdale Baptist Church, where very few kids were left in the youth group after the mass departure of our former youth pastor and the majority of the kids and young adults who followed him to “the church in Fort Lauderdale.” A few of them returned within a year or so, broken and confused; and many more appeared to leave the Christian community entirely. The fruit of the Shepherding / Discipleship movement was horrific and damaging to those who got caught up in it, and many strayed far from the Lord after a period of exuberance followed by massive, cultish exploitation.

But we were not entirely safe from exploitation even in a somewhat accountable Southern Baptist church that strayed far from the word of God to embrace ear-tickling charismatic fables. Following the exodus of many members to the new “church in Fort Lauderdale,” West Lauderdale was left at less than half its former size and still dealing with spillover from the excessive of charismania in the larger movement. There was, for example, a “prophecy” given by “a reliable, proven prophetess” that a great tsunami would wipe out South Florida in the following year, as God’s judgment against the cities for the explosive growth of homosexuality there. Her prophecy was published in a couple of charismatic magazines and caused quite a stir. The only defense our new youth minister could come up with was God’s promise following Noah’s flood never to destroy the earth with water again. Really? There have been countless tsunamis and floods since that was written, so that verse was little comfort to us. What did provide some comfort, though, was a “vision from God” that our pastor shared with the congregation:

“God has shown me what the future holds for West Lauderdale Baptist Church,” the pastor said. “Five buildings will occupy these grounds and the surrounding property. At the center will be a huge sanctuary and administrative offices to oversee ministries in the other four buildings: A Christian school, a home for unwed mothers, a theological school like Samuel’s ‘school of prophets,’ and a music ministry school for psalmists” that would produce a great wealth of new songs, hymns, and spiritual songs for the Church. So at the very same time that some were fleeing the city to escape a prophesied tsunami, our church was fund-raising like crazy and buying up homes and real estate for about a square mile around the church. The year was 1973. Forty years later, this is what West Lauderdale Baptist Church looks like:

The property surrounding the church was purchased and either demolished or used for meetings or whatever, and then abandoned. The entire neighborhood was ruined. And the original sanctuary on Davie Boulevard still stands. The grand vision never became a reality. But like most groundless “visions from God,” this one wasted thousands of dollars and destroyed the credibility of the church.

I graduated from high school at 17 and got the heck out of there as fast as I could. Too small and delicately built (at the time) to qualify for the military, I determined to take the first job that offered room and board, preferably in another city. That job was on a sailing ship – a three-masted schooner – as a member of the crew, and the only kid aboard with a bunch of 30-something guys who couldn’t make it in “real” jobs. Another perfect setup for another tragedy. But that’s a whole ‘nother story. Following that whole mess I attempted college, and when the money ran out I found a job with an ambulance company back in Fort Lauderdale again, which was still there. No tsunami had destroyed it and nothing was ever said about the “prophetess” whose “vision” must have been at least as damaging to others in South Florida as my pastor’s “vision” had been to his church and the surrounding neighborhood. It’s curious in the extreme that when prophecies fail to come true, especially with all the damage that they often cause, that nothing is said; and if you say anything then you’re “being judgmental and condemning.” What?! In bible times, these false prophets would have been put to the sword (see Deuteronomy 18:20)! And I’m judgmental and harsh if I simply ask about false prophecies? Yet for all that, I still didn’t open my bible much, except in church, or when I wanted to impress someone with how spiritual and knowledgeable I was.

I had prided myself on instructing others in seeking Holy Spirit baptism, and even in my backslidden condition I continued to do so, and when someone told me had “the gift of discernment” because I hadn’t followed Andy and dared to ask questions about failed prophecies, I fed off of that little bit of affirmation and taught whoever would listen. I had passed my state tests and got certified as a firefighter and began what would become a 30-year career. I met a Pentecostal girl and “converted” her to my charismatic beliefs, and we got married at West Lauderdale Baptist Church, attending there until the fruit of the pastor’s failed “vision” gave us cause to move to a new Charismatic (Presbyterian) church in Pompano, just North of Fort Lauderdale.

In the lessons I taught on Holy Spirit baptism, I liked to use examples from the Old Testament as well as the New. Saul, for example, became “a Charismatic” when Samuel anointed him as king of Israel, and received the gift of prophecy (1st Samuel 10:1-12). Verse 6 is pivotal:

Then the Spirit of the Lord will come upon you mightily, and you shall prophecy with them and be changed into another man.

I simply failed to mention that Saul’s appointment as king was an act of judgment against Israel for rejecting God and desiring a king like the other nations (see verse 19 of the chapter), and that the prophesying was a sign of that coming judgment. When Samuel anointed David as king in Saul’s place, “the Spirit of the Lord came mightily upon David from that day forward (1 Samuel 16:13),” and “the Spirit of the Lord departed from Saul, and an evil spirit from the Lord terrorized him (verse 14).” It looks like Holy Spirit baptism was revocable in those days, doesn’t it? But in neither of these examples is the term “baptized in or with the Spirit” employed to describe the Lord’s anointing on them. I simply misapplied the term to those Old Testament examples. I did the same with Elijah and Elisha in 2nd Kings chapter 2. The other prophets witnessing the sign said, “the spirit of Elijah rests on Elisha (verse 15).” This was God’s anointing for a specific office for a specific time. The ministries of Elijah and Elisha also represented God’s judgment upon those in rebellion against Him.

“Jesus had the anointing in His day,” I taught. “Just as Elijah threw the mantle on Elisha, so Jesus, ascending to heaven, ‘threw His mantle on the Church!’ See it fall upon them in the second chapter of Acts!”

Now doesn’t that sound all scholarly and feel all “anointed?” In truth, though, only the examples in Acts 2 and Acts 11:16 are described as “baptism in/with the Holy Spirit (see Acts 1:5).” Subsequently there were many “fillings” with the Spirit (4: 8 and 31, 7:55, etc)) and people described as “full of the Spirit,” like Stephen (Acts 6:3). But for Charismatics, Acts 8:14-17 is among the proofs that “receiving the Holy Spirit” is a separate and distinct experience from conversion to Christ.

For He had not yet fallen upon any of them; they had simply been baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus. Then they [Peter and John] began laying their hands on them, and they were receiving the Holy Spirit (Acts 8:16-17).

The text doesn’t say for sure that these people were genuine converts to Christ, but it is a safe assumption because “they were receiving the Holy Spirit.” The text also specifically states that “He had not yet fallen upon any of them,” so one might rightfully assume that these baptized converts to Christ did not, in fact, have Holy Spirit baptism as in Acts 2. But since regeneration precedes faith (John 3:3-8, 1 Corinthians 2:10, 12:3, Eph 2:4-5), it is safe to say that they were born of the Spirit and thus “had” the Holy Spirit living within. What was “missing” was the peculiar powers conveyed by the Holy Spirit which were available only through the laying on of hands by an Apostle. Otherwise Philip the evangelist would have done so himself, having brought the gospel to Samaria and harvested many souls there. None of the Samaritan converts had given evidence of the gift of tongues, which most frequently (but not always) accompanied the laying on of the Apostles’ hands (see 10:45-46). This “impartation,” or anointing, was only at the hands of the Apostles; and only they had authority from God to do so. Acts 19 demonstrated Paul’s Apostolic authority when the Ephesian converts received the sign-gifts of tongues and prophecy by the laying on of Paul’s hands. It was distinctly a sign of apostleship (2 Cor 12:12) and did not continue after the Apostles died.

As in the Old Testament examples I used above, these special powers were conveyed to a limited number of people for a limited amount of time and for a specific purpose. In Acts we see Spirit baptism among non-Jewish converts as a sign to the Church that God was making no distinction between Jews and Gentiles (Acts 10:47, 11:15-18, and 15:9), and the gift of tongues as a sign to the single generation of unbelieving Jews (1st Corinthians 14:21-22) that had betrayed and murdered their Messiah.

All believers have the Holy Spirit, dwelling in their hearts by faith (2 Corinthians 1:22, Galatians 4:6, Ephesians 3:17). Indeed it is not even possible to become a Christian unless one is born of the Holy Spirit. Baptism in the Holy Spirit, with accompanying signs and gifts, was a strictly first-century phenomenon with a strictly first century purpose. It was a sign of the end of the Old Covenant, superseded by the New. It was a sign of apostolic authority; and the oft-accompanying covenant sign of tongues portended the destruction of the Temple and the end of the Jewish sacrificial covenant. These were prophetic signs, warning of events that occurred in 70 AD. There was no reason for the warnings to persist after the judgment they warned about had come to pass!

When I see “signs and wonders” performed by such hucksters as Benny Hinn, Jesus’ tragic words, recorded in Matthew 7 come instantly to my mind:

Not everyone who says to Me, “Lord, Lord” will enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father in heaven. Many will say to Me on that day, “Lord, Lord, did we not prophecy in Your name, and in Your name cast out demons, and in Your name perform many miracles?” And I will declare to them, “I never knew you; depart from Me you who practice lawlessness (Matt 7:21-23).”


Holy Spirit Baptism – Part Two

April 12, 2014
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Be sure to read Part One before you read on. This is Part Two.

In Part One I described conversion to Christ, the longing of a 12-year-old to be like some of the older kids in the youth group who were “on fire for God,” and the secret they kept that got us all thrown out of our church when it was exposed. Then followed a search for a new church and the introduction of a radical idea: The church in the city, just being birthed in my hometown by three charismatic teachers.

There were a few Charismatic churches in town that I was to learn about in my 8th grade year, but I just had to visit the one where a girl I had a crush on went. Her father was the pastor of Memorial Baptist Church. Pastor Arnold was instrumental in introducing the new bible teachers to Fort Lauderdale. I wasn’t allowed to go to church on Sundays, but I was able to get rides to Bob Mumford’s Monday night teaching sessions at Memorial Baptist Church. He taught there until the crowds grew too large and the meetings moved to the Governor’s Club Hotel downtown. I used to literally sit at Bob Mumford’s feet for lack of any other seating. And besides, all the kids sat on the floor up front and we wouldn’t have had it any other way. Bob Mumford was entertaining and wonderful, and had a special way of making mysterious teachings sound perfectly sensible.

The Monday night meetings were captivating! The entire crowd, gathered from a half-dozen Charismatic and Pentecostal churches in the area, would sing with abandon to the glory of God. No one really led the song service beyond the first song or two. After that all of the worship was spontaneous, and seemed to be choreographed by the Holy Spirit Himself. As if on cue it might suddenly get quiet, then spontaneously erupt in made-up melodies with unintelligible lyrics. It was angelic-sounding, robust yet subdued, sweet and intimate. Hands in the air, eyes closed, just “letting the Spirit overflow.” I had never seen such heartfelt worship from so many people before, so completely absorbed in rapturous ecstasy. I had seen the super-spiritual kids from my old youth group do it, but this was hundreds of people! I yearned for the intimacy with God that they seemed to have. And I was sure that “Holy Spirit baptism” was the missing ingredient in my life.

There were plenty of people around to help me get “baptized in the Spirit,” including one very attentive “prophet” who told me, “God has called you to the ministry even from the womb, and I am to be your guide.” He even tried to take me from my home to go live with him and I would have gone happily. Until I learned from an older kid that this so-called “prophet” was a pedophile who was especially attracted to vulnerable, frail-looking pre-teen boys.

Oh well. There were others to help me get this “Spirit baptism,” and I wanted it desperately. There seemed to be differences of opinion among my mentors about “how to get baptized in the Spirit,” but some of the things they all had in common were:

  • Be completely pure in heart, “sold out” to God,
  • Confess every last known sin,
  • Pray unceasingly seeking the baptism,
  • Put aside absolutely every other interest,
  • Make peace with every enemy … in short,
  • “Be ye perfect, even as He is perfect.”

I was far from that. I thought I needed the power of the Spirit to achieve such purity and holiness, yet my teachers pressed this spiritual perfection as a prerequisite for receiving the Spirit’s power. Had I not lost sight of the truth, that salvation of imperfect, corrupt, depraved sinners is by grace alone, I might have asked:

If it is possible to achieve such spiritual perfection without Holy Spirit baptism, then what do I need Spirit baptism for?

But alas, as in the years of darkness in the Church before the Reformation, the gospel had become obscured behind mystery, superstition, and gnostic-like seeking after “deeper experiences of God.” Years before, I had been taught that every Christian has the Holy Spirit dwelling within. And if I had kept my bible open and my mouth shut, I might have apprehended the meaning of “Christ in you, the hope of glory (Colossians 1:27)” and “in Him you have been made complete (2:10),” “made alive with Him (verse 13).” No, it is not possible to “qualify” for God’s grace. No one can earn the Holy Spirit by their own efforts. The best we can offer is like filthy rags to Him! Spirit baptism and having a “prayer language” were treated like some sort of merit badge for advanced Christianity. No “head-knowledge-only” Christian could possibly understand the rewards of being “Spirit-filled.”

It took nearly a year of radical, desperate prayer and pleading and seeking and crying and begging and imploring God to pleeeeeeease immerse me in His Spirit and give me my prayer language so I could truly live for Him and have the power to be like these others; effortlessly soaring far above the “ordinary” Christian who had only doctrine and catechism and orthodoxy to guide him. But then, riding my bicycle home from Rogers Middle School, I was westbound on Davie Boulevard at the intersection of SW 9th Avenue when it happened. I still remember every detail of that magical moment when my “prayer language” spilled out out my mouth through tears of joy. I jumped off my bike and danced and jumped around, singing and crying and babbling away in ecstasy for 15 minutes or more right there on the side of the busy four-lane boulevard. Looking back, I can imagine that if it had happened today, several people might have called 9-1-1 to report “an obviously mentally disturbed kid having some sort of attack or seizure or something.” Thankfully, cell phones were not in common use in 1971.

Now, at last, I thought I would never wander away from God or fail Him again. Now I had POWER, and even the devil himself couldn’t interfere with my perfect prayers, because they would by-pass my mind and go directly from my pure spirit to God’s throne (conspicuously absent from my thinking was the clear biblical teaching of prayer directed to the Father through the Son, by the Spirit), free from the interference of any evil thought that the devil might put in my head. I could be His real true faithful sidekick now that I had been baptized in the Spirit!

And speaking in tongues was to be just the beginning. Bob Mumford described it this way:

Tongues is like the ABCs. You learn them in kindergarten. But even when you’re writing you doctoral thesis in astrophysics, you still use the ABCs! It’s only that you have grown in maturity to a point where you can use them to edify others.

I knew I was on my way to something wonderful. Maybe prophecy or healing or miracle-working faith! Or maybe special knowledge from God like Pat Robertson had: “Someone named Sally has just been healed of cancer! You know who you are, because you just felt the pain go away, just now.” Or maybe I would even have the gift of discerning spirits! Then I would know the next time some false prophet was hoping to molest me, or if someone had the wrong interpretation of a message delivered in tongues. What an adventure I was starting! I had lost touch with all the super-spiritual kids from the little church I started at, but if only they could see me now! And if only that little “head-knowledge-only” church could open up to the experience of God instead of just knowing about Him!

How little I knew what was coming. How unaware I was of how far I had already strayed from the truth. If Calvary Presbyterian Church had cared enough to take us kids to the scriptures instead of just tossing us out of the church, I might have been spared from 20 years of “wilderness wandering.” But God had an even bigger plan than I could have imagined.

The great Fort Lauderdale Experiment was ready to start, and “shepherds” were already being selected and trained. For a sneak peek at the next exciting episode, click HERE!

Until then,
Robin

 


ExCharisma: Spirit Baptism, Part One

April 10, 2014
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When I first heard the gospel of Jesus, I was eight years old. It was in a Good News Club, held at a schoolmate’s house nearly right across the street from my Elementary school. I couldn’t say no to Him. In fact I was delighted with the idea of being adopted by God Himself, and becoming Jesus’ little brother!

Being the only believer in Christ in a large, blended household, I got no guidance as to what to do next, but I knew that Jesus People went to church. So I got rides to church from the family that hosted my Good News Club. It was a little independent Presbyterian church about 5 miles or so from my house. Too far for an 8-year-old to walk, but I actually did walk there many times in during the next few years. I brought a few other members of my household to church and introduced them to Christ there.

Fast forward to middle school. Almost a teenager, looking up to the high school kids and wanting so much to be cool like they were. But mostly I wanted to be “on fire for God” like they were! They talked about God all the time. Not only in church but everywhere they went. They were completely in love with Jesus and determined to be fully His. They were perfect, powerful, sanctified, pure and holy saints in my eyes. But I was struggling just to make sense of the bible. Prayer was my strong suit, probably owing to the hardships I faced in school and at home. Asking God for stuff was easy. Working to understand and apply His word was hard. But these super-saintly older kids had it down pat somehow, and when I kept asking over and over again what their secret was, I was finally given access to the Inside Secret. And I was told that I must tell no one outside the elites in the youth group, because “our church doesn’t believe in this stuff and we could get thrown out.”

I was stunned that any church could condemn and outlaw whatever it was that could make teenagers so wonderfully dedicated to God and burning with passion for Him! Why wouldn’t every Christian want to know, and be on fire for God too? I was soon to find out why their secret was so divisive and dangerous. And soon after that, the pastor of the church joined us. And not long after that, all of us – including the pastor – were kicked out of the church. We kids called our secret “Holy Spirit baptism.” The pastor called it “second blessing.” The church called it heresy.

The church was like,

and the older kids, now “outed” for standing with their pastor, were like,

And I was like,

“Holy Spirit baptism,” according to the supercharged, on-fire-for-God kids that I so much wanted to be like, is a second “experience,” following regeneration and conversion, in which a qualified seeker receives the Holy Spirit in greater measure, empowering the recipient with power for supernatural service to God and to the Church. And they really did mean supernatural. One might get the gift of healing, or miracle-working faith, or special wisdom and knowledge, or prophecy. But everyone got a special, devil-proof “prayer language (see my previous post).”

I didn’t “search the Scriptures to see whether these things were so (Acts 17:11).” I just figured they had to be so, since all the super-spiritual, on-fire-for-God kids had received it. I had even heard some of their prayer language, and it seemed completely believable and sensible. I wanted this power, and my prayer language, more than anything!

Our defrocked pastor moved back up North somewhere and we never heard from him again. Most of the super-spiritual kids went off to college or got jobs in other towns, or got married and moved on. Being the youngest of the Black Sheep from our old church, and still in middle school, I was suddenly without a church and any way to look for one. But fairly near my house was a Pentecostal church. I had heard that they were really on fire for God and had their prayer language too, so I visited one Sunday. But they scared the snot out of me with their excesses and I ran out of there like a scalded dog. All alone again.

Just at the time I was praying desperately for a church, three bible teachers came to our town with a vision for a city-wide church, just like in the bible! We were going to make “the church in Fort Lauderdale,” just like “the church at Ephesus,” “the church at Thessalonica,” and “the church at Phillipi.” One big church, undivided, all with Spirit baptism and supernatural gifts just like in the book of Acts! Everyone knows Ephesus didn’t have a Baptist church, a Lutheran church, a Presbyterian church and all that. There was one church in a city. One glorious, powerful, militant, world-changing church in every city where God was really moving. Ours would be the first citywide church since the book of Acts! A jumping-off point for worldwide revival that would hasten the Second Coming. All the cool kids I wanted to be like would miss out on this “ground floor” move of God, but I got to be right in the thick of it. I was thrilled beyond words! But it was okay, because I would soon have my own new prayer language to perfectly express my gratitude to God.

Stay tuned for Part Two, coming soon! I’ll tell you all about Holy Spirit baptism and the Shepherding movement in Fort Lauderdale.


A Trap Along The Journey

August 14, 2012
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This Part Three in a series. Please read the two previous posts to get the larger picture of my journey so far.

While I was newly converted and living in a non-Christian home with unbelieving parents, I was still able to share my faith with my parents and siblings. The abuse continued, but I was carried along through it by my Lord and Superhero, Jesus Christ. Had I followed His written word and remained under the discipline of those who had brought me this far on my journey, I might have avoided some of the heartache and “wilderness wandering” that my teen years introduced, which endured for over twenty years.

That time was not wasted, though! For despite my unruliness and vain pursuit of things other than what God has already provided to His children in Christ, God redeemed those years and used the experience to prepare me for a unique and wonderful ministry to hundreds of my fellow sojourners in that particular wilderness.

Most of the older kids in the church youth group caught on to a movement that had been sweeping through the Church in our little part of the world for a few years. Folks called it “the Charismatic Movement” and it was remarkable for it’s adaptability. Crossing denominational lines and sweeping away laymen and clergy alike, it became a means of seducing its followers into a world of subjective experience-seeking, superstition, chaos, and naturally following all that, spiritual abuse.

Seeking and receiving “Holy Spirit baptism” promised a whole new way of experiencing God. It promised unparallelled intimacy with God, supernatural powers, knowledge, and gifts, deeper and more intimate worship, and dominion of the surrounding culture. It promised to open the door to a revival of first-century Christianity complete with apostolic miracles and thousands of new converts adding to our number every day. The promise of being powerful was very attractive to a skinny, awkward, abused, mildly autistic kid like me. Now I could have real power and respect, and physical proof of God’s acceptance, approval, and anointing! If only I could get that Holy Spirit baptism.

But of course, in order to get it, there were conditions: No unconfessed sin, no bad habits, super faith that went way beyond the norm for most Christians, super Christian discipline, and complete practical holiness. It should have occurred to me that if it takes all that to qualify a person to receive the power to accomplish that kind of super-righteousness and super faith, why do I need Holy Spirit baptism at all? If it takes all that just to qualify for it, then no one could get it – at least not without already having it! Yet when I went with the big kids to these stirring meetings of the Full Gospel Businessmen’s Fellowship International, and to the teaching meetings where Bob Mumford, Derek Prince, Don Basham, and other Charismatic leaders were teaching, everyone seemed to have this Holy Spirit baptism. The “proof” was that they could all speak in tongues (their “heavenly prayer language, known only to God”), and they could “sing in the Spirit” supernaturally uttering not only the inspired words, but an inspired melody as well. Truly beautiful to see huge crowds of people rapt with joy, hands in the air, and filling the auditorium with the beautiful, eerie sound of a tonic major chord dominating a madrigal-style fugue woven beneath it. Magical. These folks appeared to be suspended between heaven and earth inwardly, completely lost in the Spirit, and I desperately longed for such wonderful intimacy with my God.

It would be another two decades before I sought after intimacy with God in the one place I should have been seeking it – His unchanging, infallible written Word. I’ll submit other articles later which will demonstrate how and why the charismata of the first century was intended by God only for a single generation and served the purpose God had ordained for it. Suffice it to say for now that the sign gifts of tongues, miracles, prophecy, supernatural knowledge, etc served as a covenant sign to the generation of Jews that rejected and murdered God’s Son. Once the judgement those signs signified had come and gone, so too did the covenant warnings of that judgement. But that’s for another post. This one is about how the Charismatic Movement (Pentecostalism with a new name and interdenominational distinctives) took me far from the simple, unchanging, effective, practical, loving fellowship of God and into a world of superstition, fear, manipulation, and betrayal.

Some of those “big kids” in the youth group who got involved in the Charismatic movement invited me along to the meetings, and I went as often as I could. We even brought our youth pastor into it. Later on even our pastor accepted the theology of “second blessing” and was eventually expelled by the church, after they had expelled all the kids who refused to stop going to those meetings. Yup, they kicked us all out. Rather than TEACH and PROVE from the Scriptures why our pursuit of spiritual gifts was WRONG, they chose to do the easy thing instead of the right thing. May God reward them according to their deeds. For if the elders of that little church had acted properly, they could have spared dozens of people years of heartache, deception, and even madness.

Elders, Pastors, Deacons, Parents:
If your church has some heretical or heterodox error sweeping God’s people up in it, don’t simply rid the church of the problem by chasing the sheep from the fold and leaving them to the wolves! The elders of that little church did as much damage by dismissing us as our false teachers did by deceiving us. When the children are in trouble, their parents and spiritual shepherds and guardians should defend them! Fight for them instead of abandoning them to the wolves!

From that abandonment followed further seduction, betrayal, and abuse. But the choice of the elders of little Calvary Presbyterian Church all those years ago became the doorway to danger.